Annrai O’Toole

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  • Integration in the Cloud

    As Ray Wang tweeted today, Workday are dusting off the Cape Clear Eclipse technology and planning on making it more widely available to our customers. Why are we doing this? Well, there is one very simple reason: We want to make it easier for our customers to consume the powerful Web Services that we expose.

    Annrai O’Toole October 20, 2009
  • Tipping Points in Enterprise SaaS

    A core tenet of SaaS has always been that it is a lot cheaper than on-premise software. This is based on the fact that there are no upfront license fees, and no hardware, maintenance or upgrade costs. As with all technology shifts, this promise has been met with healthy skepticism and not a little FUD from the incumbent on-premise vendors.

    Annrai O’Toole July 30, 2009
  • Cloud Maintenance

    McKinsey tells us that the “Cloud” is over hyped and users can get better TCO through “aggressive virtualization”. Google responded , saying that there is more to the Cloud than just virtualization. They point out that very large scale hardware infrastructure is hard to do, the “Cloud” is more about software than hardware, and finally, that the Cloud delivers a constant stream of innovation—something that is very hard to do by just virtualizing your applications.

    Annrai O’Toole April 30, 2009
  • Predicting 2009

    Cliche, perhaps, but please indulge me as we start the year. As I sat down to think about the year to come, what’s interesting is that in spite of all the talk of global uncertainty there are some things about 2009 that seem pretty crystal clear. Let me know if you agree.

    Annrai O’Toole January 30, 2009
  • Inhaling Our Own Fumes

    On re-reading the last post I wrote, I was wondering if it was a little over the top? Was I spending too much time inside Workday drinking a little too much of our own kool aid? believing too much in our own hype? (as you can see, this sentence could go for ever).

    Annrai O’Toole December 18, 2008
  • Taking a SWAG at “The Cloud”

    On re-reading the last post I wrote, I was wondering if it was a little over the top? Was I spending too much time inside Workday drinking a little too much of our own kool aid? believing too much in our own hype? (as you can see, this sentence could go for ever).

    Annrai O’Toole December 16, 2008
  • Concrete Cloud Computing

    Benefits administration is a headache for HR people, balancing the needs of the employee for great coverage with the needs of the organization to maintain a reasonable cost profile. To make things simpler, organizations often integrate the benefits provider’s online capabilities with their HRMS, eliminating some of the pain associated with keeping employee records accurate.

    Annrai O’Toole October 02, 2008
  • Cloud Computing

    The term “Cloud Computing” is getting a lot of air play these days — it is the computing equivalent of a U.S. Presidential Election. It has loads of twists and turns, plenty of eager participants, lots of money being spent on it and it gets to consume large amounts of the news cycle…often without a lot of new information. So what exactly is “Cloud Computing”? I’m gonna have a crack at answering that question and (as an encore) talk a little about where Workday stands in the whole Cloud Computing debate

    Annrai O’Toole September 04, 2008
  • Putting the Focus on People

    Now, some of you out there may say that enterprise software solves complex problems and therefore it must be hard to use in order to accomplish its mission. But as Robert X. Cringely noted in a recent post, big enterprise software companies regularly made their software harder to use than it needs to be.

    Annrai O’Toole July 28, 2008
  • Change Can be a Good Thing – Annrai O’Toole and Workday the opposite of ERP

    A lot of the debate about “change” in ERP gets focused on the database. For a whole set of very obvious reasons, the relational database, has a crucial role in any business software system. Upon first encountering ERP, many of my smart friends would tell me that that the big source of system complexity is the thousands of database tables. Indeed, a colleague of mine from a very large bank told me they spent $50m a year to keep a global, single instance of a traditional ERP system running. This seems like a lot of money just to manage a few thousand tables!

    Annrai O’Toole July 03, 2008